About: SPAM EMAILS I’ve Received

SPAM EMAILS I’ve Received

I started this blog so people could see what a spam email is, what it consists of, and how to spot one. The typo’s are not mine unless it contains red lettering. I used red font for my notes. I’ve tried to leave the posts as original as possible.

PLEASE! do not go to any of the website addresses listed.

So, What is SPAM?

SPAM is any unsolicited email message. Many messages attempt to lure the recipient to click on their links, or to contact someone by phone or email. They request personal information about the recipient in an attempt to defraud them.

How to identify SPAM, questions to ask about the email if you are not sure.

    1. Do you know the person who the email appears to be from? If the name is familiar to you, does the message appear to be something this person would send to you? It could be that your friends email account has been “hacked,” and is being used to send SPAM. You should notify the person. Do not click on any links in the email.
    2. Hotmail now allows you to report “hacked” accounts using a link, “My friends email has been hacked.”
    3. Does the email contain any attachments or clickable downloads? DO NOT CLICK ON OR OPEN ANY attachments or downloadable links. It could be a virus attached to the email file and if you click on it a virus may be downloaded to your computer.
    4. When you compare the name of the sender to the information in the “Subject” line, and if there are any links or downloadable files, does the sender name and file names make sense to you?
    5. Does the name of the sender match the name of the person at the end of the message?
    6. Do you know the person’s name at the bottom of the message?
    7. Does the “sender” or “reply to”email address contain a different country code?
Ways to Protect Yourself and Your Computer:
    • Use the “Reading Pane” to view your emails.
    • Never provide personal information requested by email.
    • Do not use the email links to any business, especially emails that appear to be from banks, etc.  Contact your bank using your local phone book.
    • Do not give anyone your password, account or personal information.
    • If you receive a questionable email, contact that business using the local phone book. Do not use the information provided in the same email message.
    • Do not believe the stories that are sent by email. If it sounds to good to be true, then it is.

Federal Trade Commission links below provide a good source of information regarding: Scam Watch, Credit Cards, Managing Your Money, Dealing with Debt, Your Home, Jobs.

Mortgage Assistance Relief Scams: Another Potential Stress for Homeowners in Distress

Credit Card Interest Rate Reduction Scams

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Job-Hunting/Job Scams

If you’re looking for a job, you may see ads for firms that promise results. Many of these firms may be legitimate and helpful, but others may misrepresent their services, promote out-dated or fictitious job offerings, or charge high fees in advance for services that may not lead to a job.

If you find a job ad for a federal government job, you can check this official government job site listing for actual available federal jobs: USAJOBS

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Money Wiring Scams

Scammers come up with all kinds of convincing stories to get your money. And many of them involve you wiring money through companies like Western Union and MoneyGram.

Why do scammers insist that people use money transfers? Because it’s like sending cash: the scammers get the money quickly, and you can’t get it back. Typically, there’s no way to reverse a transfer or trace the money, and money wired to another country can be picked up at multiple locations, so it’s just about impossible to identify or track someone down.

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What is AnnualCreditReport.com?

AnnualCreditReport.com is the ONLY authorized source for the free annual credit report that’s yours by law. The Fair Credit Reporting Act guarantees you access to your credit report for free from each of the three nationwide credit reporting companies — Experian, Equifax, and TransUnion — every 12 months. The Federal Trade Commission has received complaints from consumers who thought they were ordering their free annual credit report, and yet couldn’t get it without paying fees or buying other services. TV ads, email offers, or online search results may tout “free” credit reports, but there is only one authorized source for a truly free credit report.

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National Do Not Call Registry

The National Do Not Call Registry gives you a choice about whether to receive telemarketing calls at home. Most telemarketers should not call your number once it has been on the registry for 31 days. If they do, you can file a complaint at this Website. You can register your home or mobile phone for free.

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Identity theft happens when someone steals your personal information and uses it without your permission.  The FTC’s updated resources explain how to protect your information and how to respond if it’s stolen.

Examples:

Taking Charge: What to Do If Your Identity Is Stolen

Safeguarding Your Child’s Future

Identity Theft: What To Know, What To Do

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The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, collects complaints about companies, business practices, identity theft, and episodes of violence in the media.

Why: Your complaints can help us detect patterns of wrong-doing, and lead to investigations and prosecutions. The FTC enters all complaints it receives into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database that is used by thousands of civil and criminal law enforcement authorities worldwide. The FTC does not resolve individual consumer complaints.

The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, collects complaints about companies, business practices, identity theft, and episodes of violence in the media.

Why: Your complaints can help us detect patterns of wrong-doing, and lead to investigations and prosecutions. The FTC enters all complaints it receives into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database that is used by thousands of civil and criminal law enforcement authorities worldwide. The FTC does not resolve individual consumer complaints.

FTC Resources: Sample Letters

FTC Forms:

FTC Additional Links:

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